My Photo

Or receive updates by email:

Delivered by FeedBurner


FIND DIANE ON...



AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Get Our Newsletter:
Green Purse Alerts!

Why My Purse is Green

Because I believe…

  • the fastest, most effective way to stop polluters is by pressuring them in the marketplace
  • women can be the world’s most powerful economic and environmental force if we intentionally shift our spending to the best green products and services
  • women have the power right now to solve many of our most serious environmental problems by using our green purses to make a difference
  • women must act – intentionally, collectively, and with the full force of our purse power behind us – if we hope to leave our children and grandchildren a better world.
  • « August 2012 | Main | October 2012 »

    September 30, 2012

    September's EcoCentric Mom Box Review

    This month's "Mom Box" from EcoCentric Mom contained a great assortment of cleaning products, personal care products, and even a few snacks.  


    IMG_2044  On the laundry front, the box included two sample pouches of Ecover Natural Laundry Powder ZERO, as in fragrance-free.  I'm partial to laundy powder as opposed to liquid in a plastic bottle, so I particularly like this sample. I should get four loads of laundry out of the pouches, given how little detergent my efficient, "high e" washing machine uses.

    The personal care products featured:

    Lotus Wei Joy Juice Mist, a combination of blood orange, Davana (strawberry-like) and Marigold essences, plus pink daisy. It comes in a glass bottle, with just a minimum plastic spray pump attached, which I appreciate, as I'm trying to keep my bathroom plastic-free.

    Beauty Without Cruelty Facial Cleanser. This is a lightly-foaming, soap-free cleanser, that is paraben free and has never been tested on animals. I like the slightly fruity scent. 

    Continue reading "September's EcoCentric Mom Box Review" »

    September 26, 2012

    How You Can Avoid Eating Arsenic When You Cook Rice

    Alarming levels of arsenic, a toxin that can cause bladder, lung and skin cancer, are showing up in rice. Why? It has to do with the way we grow food. Soil naturally contains some arsenic. But many of the pesticides and herbicides used on conventional farms add much more arsenic to the ground.

    RiceConsumer Reports, which did the research on arsenic contamination in rice, reports that "According to the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, the U.S. is the world’s leading user of arsenic...since 1910 about 1.6 million tons have been used for agricultural and industrial purposes, about half of it only since the mid-1960s. Residues from the decades of use of lead-arsenate insecticides linger in agricultural soil today, even though their use was banned in the 1980s. Other arsenical ingredients in animal feed to prevent disease and promote growth are still permitted. Moreover, fertilizer made from poultry waste can contaminate crops with inorganic arsenic."

    Most plants absorb some arsenic when they are grown. But because rice is grown in water, it  absorbs significantly more arsenic, which ends up in the rice grains we eat. 

    What can you do?

    Continue reading "How You Can Avoid Eating Arsenic When You Cook Rice" »

    September 14, 2012

    Think Ahead to Meatless Monday with this Delicious Casserole

    Farmers markets, roadside stands and bins in the grocery store are full of the ripe ingredients that combine to make recipes from La Tartine Gourmande, a new cookbook from Beatrice Peltre that emphasizes fresh, organic and seasonal cooking. The book itself features everything I like in a collection of recipes: simple directions, straightforward lists of ingredients, and beautiful photographs, thanks to the pictures taken by the author herself.  La-tartine-gourmande-book-small

    The recipes include breakfast, lunches, dinners and desserts "to inspire." They're as beautiful to look at as they are delicious to taste. And many of them, like the vegetable "tian" described below, offer a perfect alternative to meat on Meatless Monday or any day.

    Serve your tian with a fresh green salad tossed with a drizzle of olive oil, a splash of red wine vinegar, a sprinkling of sea salt and a twist of cracked pepper. If your diet is gluten free, take another 5 minutes to make some whole-grain couscous. Otherwise, use a slice of whole grain bread to sop up the juices left in the bottom of your dish. 

     

    Summer Vegetable Tian

    The following recipe serves 4. If that's all you need, you can still double up and freeze what you don't eat, or cover and serve again later in the week. 

    By the way, a "tian" is a dish from the south of France. It features layers of summer vegetables baked slowly in a low-temperature oven so that the flavors and scents of all the vegetables combine without losing their individual taste. I first tried it at a neighbor's dinner party. As delicious as it was the day it was cooked, my neighbor said it was even more flavorful the next day when the left-overs were re-heated.

     Ingredients (serves 4)

    1 tablespoon chopped lemon thyme or regular thyme

    1/4 cup chopped basil

    Eggplant rounds5 garlic cloves minced

    2 Italian eggplants (280 g; 10 oz), sliced into thin rounds

    Sea salt

    olive oil

    2 zucchini (400 g; 14 oz), thinly sliced (use a mandoline if you have one)

    3 to 4 ripe tomatoes (550 g; 19 1/2 oz), thinly sliced

    2 fennel bulbs, thinly sliced (280 g; 10 oz) (use a mandoline if you have one)

    Pepper

    Here's What You Do:

    Continue reading "Think Ahead to Meatless Monday with this Delicious Casserole" »

    September 10, 2012

    ENERGY STAR Essay Contest Shines Spotlight on Energy-Saving Kids

    Saving energy is not just for grown-ups. As EPA’s Team ENERGY STAR has shown, lots of kids have become Share storydevoted to energy efficiency, too. They’re not shy about telling you why, either. In fact, hundreds of kids have entered the Team’s Share Your Story essay contest .  Several of their posts are featured in this special Team ENERGY STAR bloggers carnival. If you’re inspired by what even the youngest children have learned about energy and climate change (and who wouldn’t be?), why not ask your kids to enter the contest, too? The deadline for submissions is September 17.

    Anne at Flour Sack Mama reports, “When I gave my elementary-aged kid a chance to enter the Team ENERGY STAR essay contest, explaining that the focus was saving energy, she gravitated, on her own, to telling how much she loves trees. Sure, she learned the connection from the story of the Lorax.  But I think she gets it, on a deeper level, because she plays outdoors….Of course, the new Team ENERGY STAR initiative does a great job of tying one family's household savings into the bigger picture. Less energy used now means a brighter future for our kids and grandkids and for the place they need to call home long after the rest of us are gone.  At our house, it truly is the little things that we focus on, like better habits of turning off those light switches.  We also made sure to purchase the Energy Star model when we needed to replace our dishwasher.”

    Shane ES picture Shane at Environmental Booty proudly  posted the amazing video her young daughter made. The video shows a simulated conversation between two very “hip” sisters, one of whom has a lot to learn when it comes to energy efficiency. “My daughter and I, and even her two sisters, really had fun taking part in the Team Energy Star Share Your Story contest.  Sure, it took finding some time in our hectic lives that was certainly hard to find.  But it brought us all together to go green, created some fun memories with my girls, and gave my Lexie one more reason to feel good about herself.” 

    Continue reading "ENERGY STAR Essay Contest Shines Spotlight on Energy-Saving Kids " »

    September 06, 2012

    Eating Organic Produce Will Reduce Your Exposure to Toxic Chemicals

    Eating fruits and vegetables that are grown without pesticides reduces the amount of toxic chemicals you eat. And if you choose organically farmed beef, you'll minimize your exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 

    Fruit These conclusions seem obvious, but Stanford University put them to the test. In a recent analysis of 230 field studies and 17 human studies conducted in the U.S. and Europe, Stanford compared pesticide residues, antibiotic resistance and vitamin and nutrient levels in organic and conventionally produced foods.

    In the study, organic foods were deemed to be just as nutritious as those grown with pesticides. Moreover, “The study confirms ... that consumers who eat organic fruits and vegetables can significantly reduce pesticide concentrations in their bodies,” Sonya Lunder, senior analyst at Environmental Working Group, said. “This is a particularly important finding for expectant mothers and kids, because the risks of dietary exposures to synthetic pesticides, especially organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides, are greatest during pregnancy and childhood, when the brain and nervous system are most vulnerable. These are two groups that should really avoid eating foods with high levels of pesticide residues.”

    Based on its review of the research, the Stanford research team also concluded that conventionally raised meat (cows raised in crammed feed lots that are routinely given antibiotics to fight outbreaks of disease) harbors more antibiotic resistant bacteria. In fact, the study found that people who eat non-organic chicken or pork are 33 percent more likely to ingest three or more strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria than those who eat organic meat.

    FOR MORE INFORMATION:

    Top Ten Organic Food Price Busters

    Here's How You Can Afford to Buy Organic Food

     

    EcoCentric Mom
    Everbuying led light
    Green by Answers.com
    GSHNetworkMember125

    Categories